Key Reports - Indigenous Kidney Health
The following reports contain statistics relating to kidney disease in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Further information about recent announcements on health policy can be found in Media.

Kidney Health for All: A report on policy options for improving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Kidney Health
September 2015
This report is informed by Kidney Health Australia’s World Kidney Day Leadership Breakfast and Policy Roundtable, and provides an overview of the issues experienced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with kidney disease. A range of policy-focused recommendations are provided for consideration by the Federal Government, State and Territory Governments, key health organisations working in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and the kidney community.

You can read the full report here.

Submission on Indigenous kidney health issues for the Senate Select Committee on Health
January 2015
The Senate Select Committee on Health was established in 2014 to inquire into health policy, administration and expenditure. Recently, they called for a submissions on with particular reference to Indigenous health. KHA provided a submission on kidney health issues and developed a specific submission on Indigenous kidney issues outlining:

  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people experience disproportionate levels of CKD regardless of urban, region or rural locality.
  • There is scope for the Federal Government to provide solid leadership in Indigenous affairs and health, with the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet (DPMC) at the centre of coordinated national policy and program implementation.
  • A competent, qualified, culturally respectful, multidisciplinary health workforce is critical to improving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health.
  • A wide range of support services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander kidney consumers and families need to be accessible and better integrated to limit the severity of dislocation for treatment.
  • Ultimately, adequately resourced preventive programs within the primary health sector reduces the progression of chronic diseases, including kidney disease and will lead to longer term savings in the later stage acute and high cost interventions.

You can read this submission in full here.

Submission on The National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan
December 2012
This submission outlines Kidney Health Australia’s initial round of comments and suggested areas of focus for the development of a new ‘National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan’  (NATSIHP). This submission further supports Kidney Health Australia’s involvement in the national consultation workshop process held in 2012.

Your can read this submission here.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework 2010: detailed analyses3

20 September 2011
This report presents detailed analyses underlying summary data presented in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework 2010, which consists of 71 measures covering the tiers: health status and outcomes; determinants of health; and health systems performance.

Read the report here.

Chronic kidney disease in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people 20113
16 September 2011
This is the first detailed analysis of chronic kidney disease in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, using a variety of data sources. Chronic kidney disease is a serious and increasingly common health problem in Australia. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, especially those who live in remote communities, are at a greater risk of developing the disease and have substantially poorer health outcomes than other Australians. 

Read the full report here.

The Central Australia Renal Study4

June 2011
This is a joint study by the Federal, Northern Territory, South Australian and Western Australian Governments. The study developed a range of feasible clinical service delivery models and care pathways to best meet (current and projected) needs for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people from remote communities requiring dialysis in central Australia.

The study assessed current issues surrounding delivery of renal services in central Australia, taking into account stakeholder consultation and activity-based data.

The findings inform policy recommendations on the most effective and feasible service delivery options and care pathways for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in need of renal services, including dialysis, and identify issues around distribution of these services. 

Read the full study here.

The health and welfare of Australia’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, an overview 2011

May 2011
This report is a comprehensive statistical overview, largely at the national level, of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health and welfare. It comprises a series of articles produced by the Australian Bureau of Statistics and the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare.

Data shows that the incidence rate for end stage kidney disease for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people more than doubled between 1991 and 2008, from 31 to 76 per 100,000 population.

In the 2007–09 period, there were about 243,100 hospitalisations of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people for chronic kidney disease and its resulting conditions, accounting for 44 per cent of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander hospitalisations.

Read this report here.

An overview of chronic kidney disease in Australia, 20095

May 2009
This report explains what chronic kidney disease is and describes its extent and patterns in the Australian community. Chronic kidney disease contributed to nearly 10 per cent of all deaths in Australia in 2006 and more than 1.1 million hospitalisations in 2006–07.

Risk factors for chronic kidney disease are highly prevalent in Australia and the number of people at risk is increasing.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were six times as likely as other Australians to be receiving dialysis or to have had a kidney transplant. Death rates from chronic kidney disease were seven and eleven times as high as for non-Indigenous males and females respectively.

Read this report here.

References

1. ISBN 978-1-74249-203-2; Cat. no PHE 151; 74pp.y Sept 2011 Canberra AIHW – Internet only

2. Cat. no. IHW 42. Canberra: AIHW. See Pages 51-53

3. AIHW 2011 Cat no IHW 53 Canberra - Refer 1.09: End-Stage Renal Disease pp 230-252. ISSN 978-1-74249-152-3; Cat no IHW 53; 2150pp.; 27 September 2011 Internet

4. Office for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health (OATSIH) - released 27 July 2011

5. Cat. no. PHE 111. Canberra: AIHW. See Chapter 6

Indigenous healthStatistics
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