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Budget & policy platforms

Budget and overarching policy platforms

The below represents our overarching policy positions on all aspects of kidney disease, from prevention through to organ donation. We use these policy platforms for advocating at critical moments in the policy cycle – Federal Budgets, Parliamentary Committee inquiries and of course, political elections.

Further information about recent announcements on health policy can be found in Media.

Submissions

Tackling Kidney Disease

Kidney Health Australia is calling for a National Action Plan to tackle kidney disease
May 2016
Kidney Health Australia has developed this action plan to provide policy makers with ways to address the growing burden of kidney disease. These initiatives seek to improve the health of those at-risk or living with kidney disease, while delivering improved effciency and effectiveness to an already burdened health system. Each is grounded in persuasive evidence that action is needed, and where there are clear potential bene#ts for people living with kidney disease. They are also informed by those living with kidney disease.

You can download this submission here.

 

 

 

Kidney Health Australia Pre Budget Submission - Federal Budget 2016-2017 
February 2016
Charting a comprehensive approach to tackling kidney disease. Proposals to guide increased risk assessment, support early detection and improve the treatment of kidney disease. Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is a major health problem, and one that is growing. Without greater focus from the Australian Government, there is clear evidence based on current trends that the situation has the potential to worsen. Kidney Health Australia estimates that 1 in 3 Australians are at an increased risk of developing CKD1. Approximately 1.7 million Australians – a striking 1 in 10 – over the age of 18 years have at least one clinical sign of CKD.

You can download this submission here.

Kidney Health Australia Pre Budget Submissions - State Budgets 2016-2017
In addition to the Federal Budget Submission, we provided each State and Territory Government with pre-budget submissions tailored for each jurisdiction. These submissions cover the “Enable” (Home Away from Home Haemodialysis Program) the various patient travel schemes, and home rebate levels. 

Australian Capital Territory - download here
New South Wales
 - download here
Northern Territory - download here
Queensland - download here
South Australia - download here
Tasmania - download here
Victoria - download here
Western Australia - download here

Kidney Health Australia State of the Nation 2015 - Chronic Kidney Disease in Australia
May 2015
A new report paints a striking picture of Australia’s kidney health, highlighting kidney disease as a silent killer which goes largely undiagnosed, and often works in partnership with cardiovascular disease and diabetes. This report highlights two confronting facts: less than 10% of Australians with chronic kidney disease (CKD) realise they have it; and 51% of people with CKD also have cardiovascular disease or diabetes. The report highlights that 6 out of 10 people with CKD have hypertension, but sadly 96% of Australian adults are unaware of the link between high blood pressure and kidney disease.

You can download the State of the Nation 2015 here.

Kidney Health Australia Pre-Budget Submission: 2015-16 Federal Budget
February 2015
Charting a comprehensive approach to tackling kidney disease. Proposals to guide increased risk assessment, support early detection and improve the treatment of kidney disease. Kidney Health Australia has included proposals to address the full spectrum of the health sector - from strategic planning and early detection, to education and support in the primary care sector, organ donation, palliative care and of course Indigenous health. All of the proposals are realistic, designed to be low-cost, no-cost or generate savings and have one principle in common - they are all designed to improve the lives of those with kidney disease through smart, targeted interventions, which seek to support existing efforts and policy.

You can download this submission here.

Kidney Health Australia submission re Terms of Reference - Senate Select Committee on Health
September 2014
Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD)is a major health problem, and one that is growing. Without greater focus from the Australian Government, there is clear evidence based on current trends that the situation has the potential to worsen. Kidney Health Australia estimates that 1 in 3 Australians are at an increased risk of developing CKD1. Approximately 1.7 million Australians – a striking 1 in 10 – over the age of 18 years have at least one clinical sign of CKD. The situation is much worse for at-risk-groups.

You can download this submission here.

Kidney Health Australia State of the Nation 2014: Chronic Kidney Disease in Australia 
May 2014
CKD is common: around 1.7 million Australians (1 in 10) aged 18 years and over have clinical evidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, as CKD typically has no symptoms, less than 10% of the people with CKD are aware they have this condition. This means over 1.5 million Australians are unaware they have indicators of CKD. The most visible outcome of CKD is end stage kidney disease (ESKD); people with ESKD require dialysis or a kidney transplant (together called renal replacement therapy) to stay alive. There are currently 20,766 people in Australia who are on renal replacement therapy. However, people with CKD are up to 20 times more likely to die from a heart attack or stroke than they are to receive dialysis. Currently, the three most common causes of kidney disease requiring kidney replacement therapy in Australia are diabetes, glomerulonephritis (inflammation of the kidney) and hypertension (high blood pressure).

You can download the State of the Nation 2014 here.

Kidney Health Australia Pre Budget Submission 2014-2015 Federal Budget
January 2014
Charting a comprehensive approach to tackling kidney disease. Kidney Health Australia budget submission includes a number of proposals to address the full spectrum of the health sector – from strategic planning, early detection, education and support in the primary care sector, and organ donation. All of the proposals are realistic, designed to be low-cost, no-cost or generate savings and have one principle in common – they are all designed to improve the lives of those with kidney disease through smart, targeted interventions, which seek to support existing efforts and policy.

You can download this submission here.

Tackling Kidney Disease: A national action plan to reduce Australia’s kidney disease burden
August 2013
Kidney Health Australia's key election policy document outlines six key areas for an incoming government to address. Each provides a range of initiatives that are realistic, tangible and will improve the lives of those living with kidney disease.

There are 1.7 million adult Australians – one in ten – with existing signs of chronic kidney disease. Yet less than one percent is aware of their condition, sadly confirming kidney disease remains Australia’s ‘silent killer’. Up to 90 percent of kidney function can be lost before any symptoms become evident. There are nearly 11,000 people on dialysis, and we expect that number to increase by 80 percent by 2020.

The treatment of end stage kidney disease is estimated to cost in excess of $1 billion in direct health expenses, with the economic cost of forgone productivity even higher. It is also ranked as the 10th leading cause of death in Australia, with more people dying from kidney disease each year than from breast cancer, prostate cancer or even road deaths. It is clearly time to act.

You can download this document here

Kidney Health Australia Pre Budget Submission 2013-2014 Federal Budget
January 2013
Charting a comprehensive approach to tackling kidney disease. Kidney Health Australia’s budget submission outlines proposals to guide increased risk assessment, support early detection and improve the treatment of kidney disease. This submission proposes a number of key ‘next steps’ to tackle kidney disease by presenting a package of evidence‐based and cost‐effective interventions spanning strategic planning, improved early detection, education, the funding of ongoing treatment and organ donation. 

You can download this submission here.

Advocacy & policyIndigenous kidney health
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