Prevent a
life with
#nofilter

Do you have diabetes?

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Diabetes is the leading cause of kidney disease. High levels of sugar in your blood damages your organs including your kidneys.

Do you have high blood pressure?

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It's very common for people with chronic kidney disease to have high blood pressure. High blood pressure puts a strain on your heart and on all of your blood vessels, including your kidneys.

Have you ever had a stroke, heart attack, or been told you have heart failure?

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Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a broad term that includes heart failure, heart attack, abnormal heart rhythms, heart valve problems and stroke. CVD can cause kidney disease and people with kidney disease are also at risk of cardiovascular disease. It goes both ways!

Is there a history of kidney failure in your family?

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Having a close family member who has had dialysis or a kidney transplant increases your risk of developing kidney disease. This is because some causes of kidney disease can be genetic, ie. the disease is inherited from your family.

Are you overweight or obese? (Body Mass Index [BMI] ≥ 30kg/m²)

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If you are overweight or obese, your kidneys have to work harder, filtering more blood than normal to meet your body's increased demands. The damage from this can lead to kidney disease.

Are you a current or former smoker?

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People who smoke are three times more likely to have reduced kidney function. Smoking damages your blood vessels, including those in the kidney, meaning your kidneys need work harder to filter blood. This can damage the kidneys.

Are you of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander origin?

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Unfortunately, if you are an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australian, you are twice as likely to have chronic kidney disease. The reasons for this are complex and include a combination of genetic, lifestyle and social factors.

Have you ever had an acute kidney injury?

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An 'Acute Kidney Injury' (AKI) is a short-term injury to your kidneys that usually happens as a complication of a serious illness, or from a sporting injury or kidney stones. Even though your kidneys may have completely recovered from the injury, it still increases your risk of developing CKD.

Are you over the age of 60, and have you answered 'Yes' to any of then previous questions?

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As you get older, your kidney function naturally declines, increasing your risk of developing chronic kidney disease.