Icon - Improving youth outcomes

Improving youth outcomes

Following a comprehensive national consultation process and research review, the Kidney Youth Program has released “The State of the Nation Report 2019 – Improving Outcomes for Adolescents and Young Adults with Kidney Disease” including major observations, findings and recommendations for action.

Read the summary report

Read the report.

Background

In July 2018 Kidney Health Australia received federal government funding to develop and pilot a Youth Program to engage and support young people (15-24 years) living with kidney disease.

A comprehensive national consultation process was coordinated involving healthcare professionals at major hospital renal units, and young people with kidney disease and their carers and families. A thorough literature review was also undertaken alongside discussions with current researchers working in this area.

The aim was to identify current services, best practice methods, and gaps in care and determine the major needs and key priorities of this cohort which will become the focus of future activities and advocacy within the program.

As a result “The State of the Nation Report 2019 – Improving Outcomes for Adolescents and Young Adults with Kidney Disease” has been compiled including major observations, findings and recommendations for action.

Read the summary report

Read the report.

Major observations and findings

The Kidney Youth community highly desired opportunities to connect and socialise with their peers. Where peer connections and support existed, they were greatly valued by both kidney youth and their carers, and have been shown to improve health and social outcomes.

Young people with kidney disease need increased youth-focussed support and education, along with assistance navigating their own health, the healthcare system and other relevant support services.

Several hospital clinics in Australia have best practice transition and transfer practices in place, which improve health outcomes and graft survival. However, in many cases dedicated transition and/or young adult clinics are aspirational due to a lack of personnel and resources. Promoting and achieving best clinical practice and investing in this area may actually result in healthcare cost savings and significantly increase overall health outcomes.

Core clinical services were generally highly rated by kidney youth patients and carers. Adult healthcare however is generally not as well-resourced nor equipped to provide the similar wrap-around youth focussed services and multidisciplinary support as paediatric healthcare. Increased funding and support for this area has been reported as a high priority.

Increasing the general awareness and understanding of kidney disease in the community was also consistently raised as a priority as was recognising and responding to the financial impact and burden associated with chronic kidney disease on kidney youth, carers and families.

Read the summary report

Read the report.

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